Top 10 Best Microphones for Choir in 2021

There is a right type of microphone for any given situation. There are the right microphones for podcasting, the right ones for a singer to use in a live show, and of course, the right ones to use to effectively capture the beautiful sounds of a choir.

It’s really important for you to understand a few things before appropriately capturing the audio of a choir (or other types of live performances for that matter). 

First, we’re going to talk a little bit about important characteristics you should have in mind before purchasing the right microphone for the job, and also offer you some practical information on how to set up your audio system, according to specific situations.

Then, we’ll name some of the best choir microphones available on the market, so that you can make the right choice for your recordings, based on product descriptions, user feedback, and price range. 

**Disclaimer: We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

Our 3 Favorite Mics

These are what most people will find useful, but we’ll also give you more options in this article.

What Type of Mic Should You Use for a Choir or Group Singing?

The right microphone for you to adequately capture sound in a choir is a condenser microphone. These types of mics have excellent pattern control, picking up the choir very accurately, and rejecting any other unwanted nearby sounds. They also have high sensitivity and sound quality, making them great for precisely capturing sound from a long distance.

What Else Do I Need to Record a Choir With These Mics?

You’ll notice that most of the microphones on this list are XLR and need phantom power. Don’t worry! It sounds scary if you don’t know anything about mics, but it isn’t that complicated.

There are 4 things you’ll need:

  1. An XLR cable for each mic
  2. A preamp that can supply energy (“phantom power”) to the mic. This is often called an audio interface.
  3. A recording device (a PC, laptop or recorder)
  4. A stand for the mics, or a way of hanging them on the ceiling (more on the latter at the end of the article)

A popular audio interface you can use for choir mics is the Focusrite Scarlett. There are multiple options you can choose from, and the difference is mostly how many mics you can connect to them. Other popular options are the Behringer UMC404 and UMC202.

If you choose another audio interface, make sure it has both phantom power and preamp.

For a recorder, a popular option is the Zoom H4n. You can use it to record on an SD card to transfer the audio file to your computer.

The 10 Best Choir Microphones

1. Rode M5-MP Cardioid Condenser Microphones

The Good

  • Great sound quality
  • Good durability
  • Small size
  • Low self noise
  • 10 years warranty 

The Bad

  • A bit expensive (could come with a case for the price of it)

Check on Amazon

These microphones — they come in a matched pair — are definitely one of the main top choices when it comes to efficiently record your choir’s audio. The pairs are carefully selected in order to have an extremely low variation of sensitivity between them.

They have great sound quality with very low self-noise, providing a clear and beautiful sound. Due to their small size, they also can be placed with no bigger worries in relation to other mics. 

They are finished with a proprietary ceramic coating material, giving them a refined and stylish black look, while also making them quite resistant to falls and other unexpected accidents.

The product also comes along with WS5 windshields and RM5 stand mounts, making your life easier when it comes to mic placement and outdoor events.

2. Samson C02 Pencil Condenser Microphones

The Good

  • Good sound quality
  • Comes with XLR connectors
  • Inexpensive

The Bad

  • Restrictive frequency response

Check on Amazon

Thing is, about these microphones, there’s really no big thing to complain about for what you’re paying for. For the price of these, the sound quality is great. Not as good as a top — and more expensive —  choice, but still pretty good.

The product also comes in a nice-looking carrying case, making it easier to take it anywhere you want.

And although these don’t come with any type of stands or windscreens, they come with gold-plated XLR connectors, facilitating power connection.

3. Behringer C-2 Studio Condenser Microphones

The Good

  • Good sound quality
  • Good durability
  • Comes with XLR connectors
  • Very inexpensive

The Bad

  • May need extra features

Check on Amazon

Although they possess a reasonable amount of self-noise, these mics still have excellent sound quality for the extremely low price you can get for them. 

These microphones can be used for many kinds of live performances, but their strong suit really is recording choirs. With a great frequency response and a reduced sound field, they are able to clearly focus on the source of the sound, rejecting any unwanted secondary noises.

These also come along with gold-plated XLR connectors and a carrying case, as well as an additional windscreen for maximum noise reduction purposes.

4. Audio-Technica PRO 44 Cardioid Condenser Microphone

The Good

  • Good sound quality
  • Small size
  • Comes with a XLR connector
  • Inexpensive

The Bad

  • Doesn’t come with windscreen or carrying case
  • Cord is too long

Check on Amazon

This Audio-Technica microphone has almost no self-noise evidence, being able to deliver clear audio quality, especially in events such as choirs and theater productions.

The mic also comes with a feature that reinforces added sensitivity, allowing a great transient response.

The product also has a very unique and rugged design with a small size, facilitating the positioning while adding descriptions regarding the placement of the mic. 

Although a great option for a good product at a very affordable range, some users tend to complain about the mic’s cords being way too long, thus making it harder to properly install it, and also about the fact that it doesn’t come with any windscreens or carrying case

5. Shure PGA81-XLR Cardioid Condenser Microphone

The Good

  • Great sound quality
  • Great durability
  • Comes with a XLR connector
  • Comes with a stand adapter

The Bad

  • Doesn’t come with any windscreens

Check on Amazon

This Shure microphone would surely be considered one of the main top choices available, also coming in at an affordable price. 

The great sound quality here is provided by a flat-response system and a cartridge design that enables crystal clear reproduction of instrumental or choir sounds. The pattern of the mic also enables the rejection of any unwanted secondary sounds.

The black metallic finish of the material makes these things highly resistant, being able to go through accidental minor falls without any major trouble, and is fully functional for quite some time. 

Although the product doesn’t come with any windscreen, it does come with a stand adapter, facilitating the placement of the mic on a mic stand.

6. Audio-Technica PRO 45 ProPoint Cardioid Condenser Hanging Microphone

The Good

  • Good sound quality
  • Comes with a XLR connector
  • Comes with a gooseneck 
  • Inexpensive

The Bad

  • Too small

Check on Amazon

Another great option from Audio-Technica, the PRO 45 ProPoint is yet another solid option for choir mic at an affordable price

This one works exclusively through a hanging system, so you’ll have to accurately position it over your choir or orchestra, pointed at the center mass from where the sounds you want captured are coming from. The gooseneck adapter will help you to point the mic in the direction you want.

The sound has a smooth frequency response and the condenser is wide-range, enabling a more effective performance from the mic. 

The fact of the mic being too small (and light) being pointed as a disadvantage is debatable. It could even be used as a clip-on mic because of that, but some users dislike the characteristic because it makes the product a little bit more fragile and easier to lose it somewhere.

7. AKG Pro Audio C1000S High-Performance Condenser Microphone

The Good

  • Great sound quality
  • Boost adapter: 3 frequency settings
  • Comes with XLR connector and windscreen
  • Good durability 

The Bad

  • A bit expensive (could come with a case for the price of it)

Check on Amazon

This AKG microphone is an extremely solid choice not only for choir sound recording but also for close-voice audio capturing (voiceovers and singing) and single instrument capturing. 

The sound quality is great and clean, with a bass cut and a -10 dB switch that brings more versatility to the table when working in a space with more shifting, inconstant sounds. There’s also a polar pattern that allows the mic to be switched from cardioid to hyper-cardioid.

The metal finish and gold-sputtered mic capsule make this product more resistant and highly protected against humidity, respectively.

It’s a very dynamic mic that is also extremely competent at the same time. You can purchase this product for a price considered slightly above average.

8. Neewer 2-Pack Pencil Stick Condenser Microphones

The Good

  • Good sound quality
  • Come with great-quality storage case and windscreen
  • Inexpensive

The Bad

  • Some faulty capsules reports
  • Doesn’t come with XLR connector

Check on Amazon

These Neewer Microphones are a solid and really affordable option for those who want to accurately capture sound at a long or close range.

They are highly sensitive, with interchangeable capsules that allow you to be effective in most recording situations, may they be in a minor smaller closed setting like a studio, or in a wider and outdoor event, like a live choir or orchestra. 

The 2 mics and its accessories come inside of a beautiful foam padded aluminum case, that helps you to improve the durability of the product, and makes the transportation process a whole lot easier as well. 

However, there is a considerable amount of users’ complaints about the durability and/or overall non-existent functionality of the mics’ capsules. There are reports that state defective capsules before even opening the box or that become defective after a few uses of the product. Although this still could be considered incommon, the possibility should be taken into account before purchasing the microphones.

9. Samson CM20P Gooseneck Podium Microphone

The Good

  • Good sound quality
  • Comes with XLR connector and windscreen

The Bad

  • Fragile gooseneck

Check on Amazon

Another solid Samson option, the CM20P is a smaller microphone that also has a consistent sound quality.

It can be used effectively both in the podium of a church at a longer distance, with the intent of capturing the sounds of the choir. 

It would be wise to be careful when handling the mic’s gooseneck since there are some reports that notify about its apparent fragility.

This product also comes along with an XLR connector, a flange mount to facilitate placement, and a multistage windscreen.

This product can be purchased at a price considered average on the market. 

10. Shure MX418/C Cardioid Condenser Microphone

The Good

  • Great sound quality
  • Isolation from surface vibration
  • Interchangeable cartridges providing different polar patterns
  • Comes with XLR connector, shock and flange mount, and windscreen

The Bad

  • A bit expensive

Check on Amazon

Another great option from Shure, the MX418/C is an extremely consistent and high-quality choice for capturing sound in the best way possible.

The mic has a wide dynamic range that enables accurate sound reproduction in many kinds of settings. There’s a feature that isolates unwanted vibration noises (up to 20 dB), and interchangeable cartridges that offer the right pattern for several applications.

There’s also a balanced output here that manages to increase the immunity to any EM hums and other interferences over the cables.   

The product comes along a XLR connector, shock and flange mount (for more than one placement scenario), and a snap-fit foam widescreen. 

You can purchase this product for a price considered above average on the market.

Frequently Asked Questions

How Do You Mic a Choir For an Indoors Performance?

If we’re talking placement, it is recommended to go for a 2 feet (central-wise) distance from the first row of the choir. And regarding the height of the mic, you should place it 2 feet above the tallest row of the choir, with the mic pointed at the center mass of the choir. 

Depending on the number of choir members and their specific positions, the correct placement of the mic system could get quite high, so it’s definitely recommended that you work with a proper hanging mechanism.

It’s also commonly advised that you should use one microphone for about 20 choir members. Using more mics than necessary could cause unwanted interferences, and using less than necessary could fail to properly capture the choir sounds in their entirety.

How Do You Mic a Choir For an Outdoors Performance?

If the choir you’re working on is going to happen outside, then you must acquire some good-quality windscreens to go along with mics. 

Besides that, since we’re probably talking about an open event with more people than usual, you must organize the positioning of the mics in such a way that they don’t get interfered with or even accidentally torn down by any crowd members.

How to Install a Hanging Choir Microphones

  1. Determine the position of the mic both regarding the length from the ceiling and in relation to the choir. Mark these positions.
  2. Cut the mic cable so that you have extra 5 feet above the ceiling.
  3. Drill a hole 1/16 inch larger than the mic cable and feed the cable through the ceiling, taping it into place with a gaf tap.
  4. Measure 5 feet from the end of the table through the ceiling minus the thickness of the ceiling. Mark this spot with tape.
  5. Reattach the two pieces of cable by soldering them.
  6. Connect the cable to a beam in a way that you have exactly the amount of cable hanging that you previously measured.
  7. Connect the cable to the cable running to the mixer, and you’re good to go!