VloggerPro https://vloggerpro.com Vlogging Gear Reviews and Tips Wed, 20 Mar 2019 13:45:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.1.1 https://vloggerpro.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/vloggerprofavico2.png VloggerPro https://vloggerpro.com 32 32 106025964 The 7 Best GoPro Cameras for Vlogging 2019 https://vloggerpro.com/best-gopro-vlogging/ https://vloggerpro.com/best-gopro-vlogging/#respond Mon, 04 Mar 2019 14:42:46 +0000 https://vloggerpro.com/?p=4006458 I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: GoPros are not for vlogging.  There are a number of reasons for this, chief among them being that its wide-angle lens, while being a great tool to capture nature, sports, and action shots, is not ideal for at least 80% of vlogging scenarios. It will quickly [...]

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best gopro for vloggingI’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: GoPros are not for vlogging. 

There are a number of reasons for this, chief among them being that its wide-angle lens, while being a great tool to capture nature, sports, and action shots, is not ideal for at least 80% of vlogging scenarios. It will quickly become annoying to viewers, especially if any of the vlog is filmed in a small or even medium-sized room.

Another reason that GoPros just don’t work for vlogging is that they aren’t made to capture audio. Now I don’t mean that they can’t record audio—they can. But they don’t do a good job of it.

So if you’re looking exclusively for a camera to record video blogs, you should get a real camera that can do that work. They are more expensive for good reasons.

This being said, I would like to note that there is a place for GoPros in vlogging. It is just a very specific space—action and sports.

After all, this is exactly what GoPros were made for. They’re waterproof, actionproof, and easy to handle and record with. 

So for vloggers who are involved in higher-intensity sports or action, needing to regularly record underwater, or wanting to do some hands-free, on-the-move recording, GoPro is your best bet. It works especially well for vloggers who will be placing narration or music on top of the video after it’s recorded.

The problem comes, though, with choosing the right GoPro. The company has released a number of strong action cameras with varying price points. To help you find the one that best suits you and your needs, here is a breakdown of your GoPro vlogging options.

​Best GoPro Cameras for Vlogging

The 8 ​Best ​Go​Pro for ​Vlogging in 2019

Hero 7 Black

This GoPro is the top-of-the-line Hero 7 camera. It is currently going for $399—$100 more than the Silver and $200 more than the White. The reason for this price bump is that it can provide better quality images with its 12MP SuperPhoto camera, which also produces 4K60 video footage. 

Another key feature that the 7 Black offers is its removable battery, making it ideal for those who have long days of recording footage. It also has HyperSmooth video stabilization, wakes on voice, 8x slo-mo recording, live streaming, TimeWarp video, and a GP1 chip—plus, it is Karma drone compatible. The Silver and White do not offer any of this functionality

I also want to take a second to talk about audio. I mentioned earlier that GoPro is not known for their audio quality. I will say that it looks like they are trying to change this with their audio recording ability on the Hero 7. The sound quality is just more reliable with this version.

When it comes down to it, Hero 7 Black is worth the extra $100 for any vlogger who is relying mainly on action-footage for their vlog. For vloggers who are just occasionally adding in snippets from their days out on the slopes, waves, or mountains, the additional cost may not be worth it. 

The Good

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    ​Offers 4K video for $400
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    Two-inch touchscreen that allows vloggers to know exactly what they are filming and change filming modes
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    ​Best stabilization that GoPro has ever offered.

The ​Bad

  • ​Slightly heavier than other Hero 7 versions (i.e. 20 grams)
  • Live streaming can be a challenge to figure out
  • ​Isn't a big leap from GoPro's Hero 6 Black

Hero 7 Silver

The Silver version in this series is currently going for $299. It offers similar capabilities to the Black, such as the fact that it can be taken 33 feet down under water and still maintain its waterproof protection. It has the two-inch touch screen. It offers voice control.

The main differences between the Silver and Black are fairly negligible, such as the 10MP camera that comes with Wide Dynamic Range, rather than the 12MPs with SuperPhoto. The Silver also offers 4K, but instead of offering 60 Wide, it has 30 Wide. It also doesn't offer as much variability in terms of the lower resolution recording. 

One downside to the Silver is that it has a built-in battery, meaning that unless you don't need to do too much shooting or you have a portable charging port that you don't mind lugging around, you could struggle with battery problems. 

The Good

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    ​One of the most affordable 4K cameras on the market
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    ​Time-lapse, slo-mo, two-mic processing for advanced wind noise reduction
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    ​Slightly lighter weight than the Black version.

The ​Bad

  • ​Doesn't offer live streaming
  • ​Only has standard video stabilization functionality
  • ​Is not compatible with Karma drone.

Hero 7 White

The White is the last version in the Hero 7 lineup. Between the Silver and the White, there are only a few key differences.

The first is that while it does also have a 10MP camera, it doesn't offer Wide Dynamic Range. It also is the only Hero 7 that doesn't come with 4K—instead, it has 1080p60. The only other difference is that it does not have GPS. 

For most vloggers, choosing between the Silver and the White will really come down to deciding if 4K is necessary or not.

The Good

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    ​The most affordable camera that GoPro currently sells
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    More user-friendly than the Black
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    Slimmer than the Black

The ​Bad

  • ​Does not shoot in 4K
  • ​No GPS
  • ​Doesn't offer WDR for images.

Fusion

The Fusion is currently the top GoPro available. It is nearly twice the price and twice the size of the HERO7 Black. The jump in both of these factors is due to the capabilities that the camera offers—5.2K30 video recording and 18MP photos. 

One of the biggest offerings that the Fusion has is Spherical Capture. This means it can take 360 degree photos—and it does it well. For vloggers, though, this is more of a gimic than anything else. You just won't use it in your vlogs. 

However, there is one 360 degree feature that you will use and that's audio. Fusion is the only GoPro to offer this. It has several microphones in different locations around the camera so that sound comes from every direction—this can be pretty handy in providing an immersive experience for your viewers.

The Good

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    ​Provides cinema-quality footage in a pocket-sized camera
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    ​Removable battery
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    ​Vloggers can rest-easy with the camera's durability

The ​Bad

  • ​Expensive for vloggers who don't need a 5K camera
  • ​Is only waterproof at depths up to 16 feet
  • ​Does not offer live streaming

Hero 6 Black

Hero 6 was released in late 2017. There was never a Silver or White version in this GoPro edition. 

For vloggers, the Hero 6 should be compared with the Hero 7 Black. The two have extremely similar specifications. In fact, the 6 was the first GoPro to offer 4K60, which was passed on to the Hero 7 Black, while the Silver only got 4K30. Another similar feature is the enhanced processor that was added to the Hero 6—the same GP1 was put in the Hero 7.

When this specification is combined with the fact that the Hero 6 can now be bought at most electronics stores or Amazon for less than $300, it becomes one of the stronger options on this list. 

The 6 offers good stabilization and the same size and weight as its successor. It does have one unique feature that wasn't passed on—nightmode. To some vloggers, this could be a helpful feature. 

There are some pretty significant weaknesses in the Hero 6 when compared to the 7, though. First, the microphone membrane is not as advanced, making the sound quality noticeably lower quality. For vloggers, who lay narration or music over after the filming, this won't matter as much.

There is also the problem of usability. The Hero 7 is significantly more user friendly when it comes to the touchscreen and menu options, especially the Silver and White versions.

The Good

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    ​The price is impressive for a 4K camera
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    Offers a strong processor
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    ​Comes with a touchscreen display with 'pinch to zoom'

The ​Bad

  • ​Not as good of image stabilization as the Hero 7
  • ​Does not offer SuperPhoto, which means less image vibrancy
  • ​No live streaming

Hero 2018

In 2018, GoPro released an entry-level camera that mixed the features and functionality of the Hero 5 and Hero 6, but at a more affordable price point. It can be found in electronics stores for under $200 and will usually come with additional accessories to help with filming and camera storage. On Amazon, I have seen the camera going for around $175 and it's not uncommon to see it for even less.

This camera is the same size and weight as all of the other Hero models and its firmware can be modified and updated to improve its performance. 

The Hero offers as 10MP camera that can shoot in both 1440/60p and 1080/60p. This means that like the Hero 7 White, it is one of the few cameras on this list to not offer 4K.

Another important aspect that the Hero offers is fewer options. For some vloggers, this isn't a bonus. They want functionality up the wazoo. But there are a lot of vloggers out there that just want great quality footage without any hassle.

They want this footage to be easy to record and this is exactly what the Hero offers for all action shots. No, it's not 4K, but 1080p really isn't bad. And the simplicity that is provided with this camera is something to be desired. 

The Good

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    ​Incredibly affordable action cameraEasy to use
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    ​Same durability as all other GoPro cameras.

The ​Bad

  • ​Does not offer 4K recording
  • Has significantly fewer features compared to other models
  • Less powerful Amarella processor

Hero 5 Black

This Hero version and the other camera in this Hero edition, Hero Session, were the first to provide 4K recording. Due to the fact that it is several years old and a few editions have come out since, it is easy to find a 5 Black for less than $250—a steal for any 4K camera.

While there was a big leap in terms of the technology used between the 5 Black and the 6, the Hero 5 still offers a number of strong features besides its 4K quality. This include everything from high frame rates and HDR photo capture to an external mic input and being compatable with Karma drones.

The battery in this version is removable, which is another strong selling point, as well as its 12 MP camera. Then there is the fact that it offers GPS, which creates the possibility of adding location tagging.

In short, the Hero 5 Black may have its shortcomings, such as a slower processor and a less user-friendly display, but it also has a number of strengths. Chief among these strengths is that it offers 4K video, Protune, and GPS for a lot less than any other camera on the market. 

The Good

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    ​A great price for a 4K camera
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    ​Offers some features that were discontinued in the Hero 6 and then added back on the 7 Black
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    ​Has a removable battery

The ​Bad

  • ​A slower processor when compared to the newer models
  • Does not perform well in low-light scenarios
  • ​Built with older technology

​While GoPros should never been seen as the go-to vlogging camera. They can be a powerful vlogging tool for certain vloggers who pursue a specific type of vlog (i.e. action, sports, etc). Picking out the right GoPro is essential and requires a thorough assessment of what your vlogging needs are and which camera can best fulfill them.

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Top 6 Best DSLR Cameras for YouTube Vlogging 2019 https://vloggerpro.com/the-6-best-dslr-cameras-for-youtube-vlogging/ https://vloggerpro.com/the-6-best-dslr-cameras-for-youtube-vlogging/#respond Thu, 28 Feb 2019 14:42:41 +0000 https://vloggerpro.com/?p=4006470 Digital single-lens reflex cameras are really popular between YouTubers. Some of these have really nice features for vloggers, and their recording quality is the best. Their performance in low light makes them great for indoors and they’re highly adaptable. That’s why I’ve made this list of the 6 best DSLR cameras for YouTube vlogging. Comparison [...]

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Best DSLR for YouTube Vlogging

My personal favorite: Canon EOS 80D

Digital single-lens reflex cameras are really popular between YouTubers. Some of these have really nice features for vloggers, and their recording quality is the best. Their performance in low light makes them great for indoors and they’re highly adaptable. That’s why I’ve made this list of the 6 best DSLR cameras for YouTube vlogging.

Comparison Table: 6 Best DSLR Cameras for YouTube Vlogging

​Camera

Flip Screen

Mic. Jack

Resolution

Price / Our Rating

2160p30(4k)

$2,999.00

1080p60

$999.00

1080p60

$699.00

1080p60

$799.00

1080p30

from $749.00

1080p60

from $395.00

How to Save Money When Buying a New DSLR for YouTube Vlogging

good dslr lens for vlogging

Canon 50mm f/1.4

When it comes to DSLRs, quality is attached to the lenses you buy with them.

This is why when buying a DSLR, I always recommend not buying the starter lens kit. Instead, get a good lens straight away.

Usually, starter lens kits are low quality. For vlogging from home, you will want to start with a fixed 50mm f/1.8 or f/1.4 lens. With them you won’t suffer perspective distortion, your image will be sharper and low-light recording will be much better. On the other hand, you’ll need a wide-angle lens (18-35mm) if you want to show more of your surroundings, or if you’re recording really close to the camera (like when walking around with the camera).

You might want to get an 18-50mm f/1.8 lens if you want to have a lens that is good for both situations. Nevertheless, when your vlogs involve speaking in front of a static camera, a prime 50mm is best.

Most of the time, buying with a starter lens kit will be more expensive. If this is the case, buy the body and get one of my recommended lenses straight away. The mistake of buying the starter lens kit is that you will more sooner than later need a better lens. Why not buy it straight from the beginning and skip the starter lens kit?

Still, bear in mind that few DSLRs come with the starting lens kit for no extra price. Just make sure they aren’t going to charge extra for it before ordering one.

Take into account that you will also need a good microphone. DSLRs’ built-in microphones are not good. If you want to get the best quality with a DSLR, you better pick up with sound quality too. Here you will find a list of good shotgun mics you can use. You should bear in mind their cost before finally deciding which DSLR to get.

Finally, you will want to consider a tripod either for recording in selfie mode or for recording in a home studio setup. I’ve reviewed the best for vlogging right here.

Now, let’s start.

A Quick Guide on Sensor Size

You will see that the most significant difference between some cameras here is their sensor size. The best ones are Full-Frame, while the rest are APS-C.

Their difference? The explanation is simple:

Full-Frame is the biggest sensor size. This means that they are significantly better in low light—and by low light, I’m including indoors during the day— they can also achieve a more intense Bokeh effect and they are able to capture a wider frame, like if you were zoomed out.

comparison between aps-c and full-frame sensor sizes - Vlogger Pro

The image above shows how much more full-frame cameras are able to capture from the same distance and with the same lens in comparison to APS-C size. It also makes it obvious why they capture more light since they’re bigger.

Full-Frames are capable of suppressing Perspective Distortion because they can use tele lens that still capture a wide area.

Since they’re better in low light and can use better lenses, they offer the highest quality. Colors and sharpness are just on point—and it’s the main reason they cost a lot of money.

APS-C cameras listed here have smaller sensors, but they’re still good. In fact, their sensors are larger than any compact or camcorder.

The most common choice for YouTube is an APS-C DSLR when recording from home, and a good compact camera for traveling and street vlogs. Only the most serious vloggers get a full-frame camera.

After all, they are not cheap.

Now that you know all this, here is the complete list of the best DSLRs for YouTube vlogging:

And the 6 Best Are…

Canon EOS 5D Mark IV – The Professional Youtube Camera

The Canon EOS 5D truly is the king of prosumer-level DSLRs, especially for video. The Mark IV is the latest update, which introduces 4k recording.

This update took a long time — around 4 years — and I’m sure it was mainly due to Sony mirrorless cameras becoming more popular.

But that doesn’t matter now. We already got the update we needed for arguably the one of the best DSLRs on the market.

This camera has the great autofocus and dynamic range for high-contrast scenes. It also offers great sharpness and colors. This makes it really good for makeup and beauty. This is why it’s a very popular camera between wedding photographers.

Most cameras lose some color quality in higher ISOs, but this one simply doesn’t. It maintains its sharp colors even if you need to record at high ISO.

You can trust this camera will live up to the challenge of giving the best quality in low light—unless you’re recording in a cave, of course.

Now, one of the biggest downsides is that this camera isn’t the lightest DSLR. But for vloggers, the main problem is the lack of an articulating screen. This can be a deal breaker for Youtubers.

Still, remember that this is a full-frame camera, so it’s really hard to end up outside of the frame by accident. Still, even for me, the lack of an articulating screen can be annoying.

This is why the 5D Mark IV might be the highest quality camera you could get for Youtube, but it might not be the right one for you.

The Good

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    Top video performance
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    Great battery life
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    Great autofocus
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    Full-frame 4k recording

The ​Bad

  • Heavy (1.96lb)
  • No flip screen
  • No in-body stabilization

Canon EOS 80D – Best Video DSLR for Youtubers

The 5D Mark IV is an amazing camera, but it might be too much if you just want to record YouTube videos. Besides, it doesn’t have an articulating screen.

If you want a great camera to record your YouTube videos and even make short films, the Canon EOS 80D should be your main option.

Here’s why this one is my personal favorite for video blogging:

The Canon EOS 80D’s autofocus is the best you can find for this price.

It is good even in low light.

One of the most common troubles vloggers face is the lack of a good lighting setup. If you know a little bit about lighting, you can, of course, get away with a DSLR that doesn’t perform well in these situations. However, you can trust the Canon EOS 80D when used in non-optimal lighting conditions.

Its battery is good. The Nikon D7200’s battery lasts for a little bit longer than this one. However, it matches the 5D Mark IV— and it saves you $2000.

Canon EOS 5D Mark IV: 900 shots |Canon T7i: 600 shots | Sony A77 II: 480 shots |Nikon D5300: 600 shots |Canon EOS 80D: 960 shots|Nikon D7200: 1110 shots

This gives you an idea of the kind of value you’re getting for your money.

However, the camera isn’t perfect. It can record only up to 1080p60/30, which is a bit disappointing knowing that many compact and mirrorless are coming with 4k recording.

Also, the newer T7i and 77D are both cheaper, but they have a new sensor and all the video features the 80D brings. The 77D is especially focused on filmmaking and comes with a lower price and in-body image stabilization, something you will miss from the 80D.

So, if you plan to only give your DSLR usage for home video, you can sacrifice battery life and extra-sharp autofocus for a cheaper price tag with these camera cousins. If you choose the 77D instead, you will pay less in the initial upfront for the body and for future lens upgrades since you’ll be able to get cheaper lenses that lack the stabilization the 77D includes.

The Good

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    Made for video (mic jack, flip screen, hot shoe)
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    Really good ​​​​autofocus
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    Good battery life
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    Light for a DSLR

The ​Bad

  • No in-body stabilization
  • There are many cheaper 4k cameras

Canon EOS 77D – Best Value DSLR for Youtube Vlogging

The Canon 77D is a 24.2-megapixel DSLR camera marketed for advanced amateur videographers and photographers. Often said to be a midpoint between the lower-end Canon T7i/800D and the higher-end Canon 80D, the 77D shares a lot of common features with the other two.

All three are equipped with APS-C CMOS sensors, have articulated LCD touchscreens and external microphone ports. They are also equipped with an impressive dual-pixel autofocus system which is one of the most effective autofocus systems for DSLRs.

So, what makes the 77D standout from its siblings?

Well, for a significantly lower starting price, the 77D offers a higher ISO capability than the 80D. This is because the 77D (as well as the T7i) has a more advanced image processor than the 80D. Thus, giving the latter a step of ISO advantage, which may be useful when shooting in extremely dark situations.

The Canon 77D also has a 5-axis image stabilization feature in video mode which makes it better for handheld operation as compared to the 80D. This is also an advantage when compared to the T7i.

It is also unfortunate that the 80D does not offer 4k video recording. Now, the 77D doesn’t offer 4k as well but getting the 80D for that high price tag might not be worth it for you as they offer the same video features and quality.

On the other hand, the 77D and the T7i are almost identical. You might ask then, “why would I go for the more expensive 77D then?”. Well, there are some features the 77D has that you might want to spend those extra dollars on.

One of them is anti-flicker recording mode which counters light flickering when you’re shooting in a particularly sunny setting.

But most differences are about design. For example, the 77D has an LCD screen on top of the camera for easy review of shooting settings. It also has a quick control dial to navigate the options more easily

But the most important one is the inclusion of in-body stabilization, which will allow you to get cheaper lenses without OIS.

And although neither the 77D nor the T7i has a weather-sealing, the 77D’s body is constructed to be more rugged than the T7i’s making it the better choice for vlogging outdoor activities.

However, like most DSLR’s the 77D is a bit bulky and heavy especially compared to the more sleek and pocketable mirrorless cameras.

The Good

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    Made for video (stabilization, flip screen, mic jack and hot shoe)
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    Effective dual-pixel autofocus
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    Better sensor than the 80D
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    Small and lightweight

The ​Bad

  • No 4k recording
  • Not weather-sealed

Canon EOS T7i – Best DSLR for Starters

Canon’s Rebel line has been the favorite between YouTubers for quite some time. Starting from the T3i, these cameras have been the main choice when buying your first DSLR for video.

The main reason Rebels are the first DSLR many YouTubers start with is because they achieve good cinematic quality and are video friendly. It’s also because Canon offers a huge float of high-quality lenses for any kind of Youtuber, and you’re able to use them for a relatively low price thanks to Rebel cameras.

Now the Rebel lineup is much better, they now come with video autofocus, WiFi, NFC, more MPs and better performance in low light.

Also, compared to the previous T6i, this one comes with a new sensor. It gets really close to the image quality you get from the more expensive Canon EOS 80D, and the main reason is that this one is using an even more up-to-date sensor.

It can record 1080p60/30, which is the least we can ask for, since there are already several mirrorless and compact cameras that can record 4k at this price range.

This camera also has an articulating screen and a pretty decent battery duration of around 600 shots. This is also part of the reason why it’s a popular YouTube camera.

It might still be a good idea to get the T6iinstead of this one for the price difference. However, remember this new sensor will give you more quality in low light.

The Good

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    Entry-level DSLR for video
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    Made for video (flip screen, mic jack, hot shoe)
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    Better sensor than the 80D

The ​Bad

  • Expensive for a camera for starters​​​​
  • No 4k recording
  • No in-body stabilization

Canon EOS Rebel T6i – Cheaper Alternative to the T7i

Even though Canon REBEL cameras were supposed to be the low-price lineup for Canon video DSLRs, their price went up a lot as they released new models.

That’s why getting an older Rebel camera is not a bad idea. The T6i is still a pretty decent camera for Youtube starters.

The camera has all the basics for video, but it’s like a toned-down version that is slightly cheaper.

It comes with an older image processing technology, which results in slightly noisier images in high ISO. It also has fewer focus points (45 vs. 19), a lot less battery life (600 vs. 440 shots), and it lacks Bluetooth and the timelapse feature.

All these differences make it seem as if getting this older version isn’t worth the hundred bucks you’ll save, but it is a viable option if your budget is getting tight.

After all, it still has a flip screen, mic jack, hot shoe, 1080p30 recording, touchscreen, WiFi, and NFC.

The Good

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    Good DSLR for starters
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    Made for video (mic jack, flip screen, hot shoe)
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    Cheaper price

The ​Bad

  • 1080p only up to 30 fps
  • Low battery life for the price
  • No 4k recording

Nikon D5300 – Best Cheap DSLR for Starters

This Nikon camera doesn’t offer the nice video snapshots feature from Canon, but it does have some advantages you might like more. It’s the direct alternative to the Canon EOS Rebel T7i for those that don’t want to spend so much money on a camera to start out.

The camera has all the basics you will want in a camera for self-recording. It is an APS-C sensor camera that comes with a flip screen, mic jack, and hot shoe.

It is the cheapest DSLR for video with just enough of what you need to record high-quality video.

But really, do not let the camera price fool you. It even performs decently in low-light conditions, as long as you don’t have to go above the 3200 ISO mark.

If you got a basic lighting setup at home, this camera is enough to deliver the image quality you will need to start your Youtube channel on the right foot.

You’ll just need to take a couple of things into consideration:

Its autofocus is not as good as the Canon’s. The T7i’s autofocus is more reliable and much faster. It’s a bit slower and does more hunting.

On the other hand, It has more battery life than the Canon. This one lasts for 600 shots, a big difference compared to the Canon’s 440 shots.

It includes WiFi, but doesn’t have anti-aliasing filter. A camera with low-pass filter will get rid of the moiré effect. This one doesn’t have one, but it has a sharper image thanks to this. It will be a better option as long as you don’t wear any striped clothing for your YouTube videos.

It might not have a touchscreen, Bluetooth and NFC like the T7i, but this is not something you will miss so much for the huge price difference.

The Good

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    Affordable with good value
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    Made for video (flip screen, mic jack, hot shoe)
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    Good battery life for the price

The ​Bad

  • No in-body stabilization
  • No touchscreen, Bluetooth and NFC

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Top 7 Best Phones for Vlogging [2019] https://vloggerpro.com/best-phones-vlogging/ https://vloggerpro.com/best-phones-vlogging/#respond Wed, 30 Jan 2019 12:12:31 +0000 https://vloggerpro.com/?p=3504 It’s that time again. You need a new phone. Maybe your screen cracked. Maybe it fell out of your pocket at a concert. Maybe you’re just ready for an upgrade. But your situation is slightly different than the average person’s. You’re trying to grow your vlog and a your phone has become a vital device [...]

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It’s that time again. You need a new phone. Maybe your screen cracked. Maybe it fell out of your pocket at a concert. Maybe you’re just ready for an upgrade.

But your situation is slightly different than the average person’s. You’re trying to grow your vlog and a your phone has become a vital device in helping you create quality content.

The trouble is, how do you choose? Should you stick with the same brand you’ve been using for the last ten years or is it time to switch things up?

To help you make the right decision, I’ve taken an in-depth look at the newest phones on the market and picked out the 7 best smartphones for vlogging. To get things going, I’ll start with the most popular choices:

The Best Smartphones For Vlogging In 2019

Why Use a Smartphone for Vlogging

Vlogging is a creative and social expedition that can easily run your bank account dry. From expensive cameras to almost necessary accessories like tripods, external mics, and even light setups to make your vlog look professional, the costs can skyrocket easier and much quicker than expected. However, vlogging doesn’t have to drain your bank account if you don’t want it to.

Almost all of us have smartphones. Smartphones in 2019 are smarter and more advanced than ever, many of them containing the same technology and specs as some sophisticated DSLR cameras.

Most flagships from 2019 already have 4k recording. Well, guess what? Many real cameras can’t even do that. For something that you already carry around with you all day, you actually might have more options available to you using your smartphone, the same piece of technology you use to text, call, and “social media.”

One of the benefits of using your smartphone to vlog is that it’s always with you. DSLRs can take up quite a bit of carrying space, and even thin mirrorless cameras will need a separate pocket to carry.

Using your phone to vlog can save valuable space and money as you’ll already have it by your side.

With that said, let’s look at the in-depth reviews of some of the best phones for video blogs you can get this year.

1. iPhone Xs

I know plenty of people who are ‘Apple People’. To them, it’s ‘Apple or die’.

They don’t care that their phone doesn’t have all the capabilities that other phones do. They don’t care that it costs more. Apple is part of their identity.

And, thankfully, for any vloggers out there who fall into the same category, the iPhone Xs is going to enable you to maintain your lifestyle.

I can say, without a doubt, that the iPhone Xs is the best iPhone that Apple has made. The camera is simply superb. They did this with smarter software configurations, rather than a significant change in hardware.

The combination of the two cameras, that both have OIS, provides a powerful punch. They capture color accurately and the one even has a telephoto sensor, meaning it can get incredible detail from impressive distances—more so than just about any other phone on the market.

Additionally, Apple has paired a new sensor with a new chipset. This means incredible speed, Smart HDR, and Depth Control. It can get great shots in lighting that isn’t ideal (i.e. subject detail when the sun is in the background).

It is important to note that video doesn’t get true and total HDR, but the phone does have noticeably enhanced video quality.

This phone isn’t for every vlogger. For those needing to shoot in low-light situations, there are better options.

However, for those who need to be able to pull out their phone quickly and shoot something at the last minute, iPhone has the most user-friendly, simple interface. With little effort, vloggers can get high quality, stable footage, while still having access to fancy features, like various studio lighting effects.

Specifications:

  • Release: October 2018
  • Camera Quality: Dual 12MP wide-angle/telephoto cameras (rear); 7MP (front)
  • Aperature: f/1.8 (wide-angle) f/2.4 (telephoto); f/2.2 (front)
  • Video Quality: 4k, 1080p HD, 720p HD (24, 30, or 60 fps)
  • OIS: Yes
  • Chip: A12 Bionic chip
  • Display: 5.8″
  • Weight: 6.24oz
  • Dimensions: 5.65″ x 2.79″ x 0.30″
  • Battery: Up to 14 hours (wireless video playback)

Pros:

  1. Ease of use
  2. Most compatible with other Apple products
  3. Nearly HDR quality

Cons:

  1. Expensive
  2. Still lacks low-light abilities
  3. Doesn’t offer as many features and functions as other options

2. Samsung Galaxy S8

I also know plenty of Samsung people. And for good reason. The phone’s capabilities are impressive—especially its camera.

The fact that the older version of this Samsung phone still makes this list should say something.

It is all about providing unparalleled detail in every shot, both photographs and videos. It really does prove that quality isn’t necessarily only born from megapixels.

The combination of a wider aperture and OIS means it’s perfect for vloggers who are shooting on the move and in low-light situations.

While the phone does offer 4k, it tends to produce better quality video at 1080p. This is mainly because 1080p is the highest quality level where it still offers HDR and tracking autofocus. For some vloggers this could be a downside, but most won’t need their videos to be 4k quality.

Specifications:

  • Release: April 2017
  • Camera Quality: 12MP AF (rear); 8MP AF (front)
  • Aperature: Dual f/1.7 (rear); f/1.7 (front)
  • Video Quality: 4k, 1080p HD, 720p HD (30 or 60 fps)
  • OIS: Yes
  • Chip: Qualcomm Snapdragon 835/ Samsung Exynos 8895
  • Display: 5.8″
  • Weight: 5.46oz
  • Dimensions: 5.86″ x 2.68″ x 0.31″
  • Battery: Up to 18 hours (wireless video playback)

Pros:

  1. Very affordable
  2. Consistent video quality
  3. Strong tracking autofocus

Cons:

  1. Older model
  2. No dual-sensor system
  3. No HDR in 4k

3. Samsung Galaxy S9 Plus

The Samsung Galaxy S9 Plus was Samsung’s way to up their camera game even more. For the vlogger who loves to experiment with different features and enjoys constantly discovering new functions, this is the phone for you.

It is Samsung’s first attempt at dual camera technology and they nailed it. The one f/1.5 aperture camera, in particular, produces very impressive low-light content. And the main rear camera has variable aperture so, depending on the brightness, the iris can open and close to let in the appropriate amount of light.

One of the aspects of the S9 camera that makes it unique to others is the fact that it provides 1080p slo-mo recording not only in 960fps but also in 240 fps.

A downside that does come with this phone is that, while it can shoot at 60fps in 4k, it can only record for 5 minutes. For vloggers, this is likely one of the bigger factors of the phone to take into consideration when making a decision.

Specifications:

  • Release: March 2018
  • Camera Quality: Dual 12MP wide-angle/telephoto (rear); 8MP (front)
  • Aperature: Dual f/1.5 and f/2.4 (rear wide-angle); f/2.4 (rear telephoto); f/1.7 (front)
  • Video Quality: 4k, QHD, 1080p HD, 720p HD (30 or 60 fps)
  • OIS: Dual
  • Chip: Qualcomm Snapdragon 845
  • Display: 6.2″
  • Weight: 6.66oz
  • Dimensions: 6.22″ x 2.9″ x 0.33″
  • Battery: Up to 18 hours (wireless video playback)

Pros:

  1. Lots of features
  2. Impressive zoom capabilities
  3. Powerful slo-mo

Cons:

  1. Expensive
  2. Limited 4k recording times
  3. Complex camera app

4. Google Pixel 3

Samsung and Apple may have led the way with camera phones over the last few years, but I predict Google has officially put this to an end with their Pixel 3 offering.

It may only offer a single lens, but that lens easily outperforms other two-lens phones. The real revelation with this phone is its low-light capabilities. There is simply no other phone that does it better. So if you vlog at night or in poor lighting on a regular basis, there is a strong argument that this is the phone for you.

The contrast of quality between the Pixel 3 and most other phones is so significant that it can be picked out in a blind comparison with ease. This exceptional quality is mainly due to impressive processing power and the software rather than fancy camera hardware.

The main problems on the Pixel 3 are the front-facing camera and the zoom. The front camera can sometimes cause distortion and the zoom just isn’t as good as some of the other phone’s.

A final aspect of this phone that will make it better suited for certain vloggers is the front-facing camera quality—it’s really good. Vloggers who prefer to shoot this way will really like the results that the Pixel 3 provides.

Specifications:

  • Release: October 2018
  • Camera Quality: 12.2MP dual-pixel (rear); 8MP wide-angle and normal FoV (front)
  • Aperature: f/1.8 (rear); f/2.2 (front wide angle); f/1.8 (front normal)
  • Video Quality: 4k, 1080p HD, 720p HD, 480p (30, 60, 120, or 240 fps)
  • OIS: Yes and electronic image stabilization
  • Chip: Qualcomm Snapdragon 845
  • Display: 5.5″
  • Weight: 6.66oz
  • Dimensions: 5.7″ x 2.7″ x 0.3″
  • Battery: Roughly 11 hours (wireless video playback)

Pros:

  1. Excellent auto focus
  2. Impressive low-light functionality
  3. Consistent stabilization

Cons:

  1. No real optical zoom
  2. Expensive
  3. Only offers 30fps at 4k

5. LG V30+

Vloggers who don’t do their research will likely overlook the V30+. LG just didn’t heavily advertise it like Samsung, Google, and Apple did with theirs. But this doesn’t mean it’s not on the same level.

The V30+ provides professional-quality videography. This can be seen by the fact that it has both a 16MP and 13MP lens on the back.

Additionally, it can shoot in dimensions that most other phones aren’t able too. More specifically, at 30fps the phone offers videos at 3840 x 2160p.

Finally, I can’t talk about the V30+ and not mention the features. To put it simply, when it comes to shooting content, I have only seen this many photography and videography functions and features on mirrorless and DSLR cameras.

Specifications:

  • Release: October 2017
  • Camera Quality: Dual 16MP standard angle (rear); 13MP wide-angle (rear); 5MP (front)
  • Aperature: Dual f/1.6 (rear standard angle); f/1.9 (rear wide-angle); f/2.2(front)
  • Video Quality: 4k, 1080p, 720p (30 and 60 fps)
  • OIS: Steady Record 2.0
  • Chip: Qualcomm Snapdragon 835
  • Display: 6″
  • Weight: 5.57oz
  • Dimensions: 5.97″ x 2.97″ x 0.29″
  • Battery: Roughly 15 hours (wireless video playback)

Pros:

  1. Feature-rich
  2. Log profile
  3. Incredible color vibrancy

Cons:

  1. Weak software in some areas
  2. Poor front-facing camera quality
  3. Expensive

6. Huawei Mate 20 Pro

For vloggers who need a good-all-around camera phone, the Huawei Mate 20 Pro is the answer. It captures well in just about any lighting, it has a great zoom range, and its overall video quality is superb.

I want to tell you more about the zoom, though. The range is impressive—it can capture, and capture well, on a zoom range of 0.6x to 5x.

And while the camera operates proficiently in most lighting, it rivals a DSLR when lighting conditions are optimal.

Finally, at both 4k30 and 1080p60, there is great stabilization. Unfortunately, it doesn’t offer 60fps recording at 4k.

Specifications:

  • Release: November 2018
  • Camera Quality: Triple 40MP wide-angle (rear); 20MP ultra wide-angle (rear); 8MP telephoto (rear); 24MP (front)
  • Aperature: f/1.8 (rear wide-angle); f/2.2 (rear ultra wide-angle); f/2.4 (rear telephoto); f/2.0 (front)
  • Video Quality: 4k, 1080p HD, 720p HD (30 or 60 fps; 720p at 960 fps)
  • OIS: Huawei AI Image Stabilization
  • Chip: Huawei Kirin 980
  • Display: 6.39″
  • Weight: 6.66oz
  • Dimensions: 6.21″ x 2.8″ x 0.33″
  • Battery: Roughly 19 hours (wireless video playback)

Pros:

  1. Leica lenses
  2. Impressive pro features
  3. 3 rear lenses

Cons:

  1. Expensive
  2. Extensive post-production
  3. Lacks monochrome lens

7. OnePlus 6

I feel like this phone was built for vloggers. Its videography is extraordinarily high-resolution. And it cleverly gives nearly equal emphasis on both the front and rear-facing cameras.

The phone is also able to compete with the LG V30+ by providing the exact same 3840 x 2160 resolution at 30fps.

The camera can perform well in low light due to the size of the sensor on the 16MP camera. This is further improved by the combination of OIS and EIS on this camera.

Another vlogger-friendly aspect of this phone is that it is extremely easy to use. So for those who don’t want to spend hours learning how every function works, the OnePlus 6 is a good fit.

Finally, it offers slo-mo recording at 480fps. This means vloggers that like this stylistic touch can enhance the quality of their vlogs considerably.

Specifications:

  • Release: March 2018
  • Camera Quality: Dual 20MP (rear); 16MP (rear); 16MP (front)
  • Aperature: f/1.7 (rear 20MP); f/1.7 (rear 16MP); f/2.0 (front)
  • Video Quality: 1080p HD, 720p HD (30 fps)
  • OIS: Yes and electronic image stabilization
  • Chip: Qualcomm Snapdragon 845
  • Display: 6.28″
  • Weight: 6.2oz
  • Dimensions: 6.13″ x 2.97″ x 0.31″
  • Battery: Roughly 9 hours (wireless video playback)

Pros:

  1. Affordable
  2. High-quality front-facing camera abilities
  3. Strong stabilization

Cons:

  1. Lacks strong zoom capabilities
  2. Lacks the highest resolution recording options
  3. Doesn’t offer as many advanced features as other phones

Don’t Forget Your Add-Ons

Whichever smartphone you choose in the end, you will need a selfie stick. Here I made a list of some options you can get straight from Amazon. Also, you will certainly want a microphone to go with it. There are extremely cheap mics for 10-20$ that will improve your audio a lot.

After these two cheap add-ons and a fast micro SD for 4k recording with a decent storage, you will be good to go to start vlogging with your phone.

Conclusion

Vloggers have a growing number of tools at their disposal. A great camera phone is one that is non-negotiable. However, when it comes time to pick and choose, the vast variety can be overwhelming. Properly vetting the options and identifying your device priorities is the most effective way of making the right decision.

The above list includes all of my favorite phones going into 2019. However, it is important to dig deeper before making the final call. Know what you want and do your research. There are other excellent phones are the market and some of those could better fit your vlogging needs, especially for niche bloggers who want very specific features and functions. In the end, it’s worth the time and effort that a little research requires.

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Top 5 Best Vlogging Cameras Under $300 [2019] https://vloggerpro.com/best-vlogging-cameras-under-300/ https://vloggerpro.com/best-vlogging-cameras-under-300/#comments Tue, 01 Jan 2019 22:22:31 +0000 http://vloggerpro.com/?p=1013 Whether you’re looking for a camcorder or compact camera for vlogging on a tight budget, you will find here the list of the best vlogging cameras under $300 on the market. This price range is where you will start finding really useful cameras for video blogging that are enough for most vloggers. Still, they all lack an [...]

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Whether you’re looking for a camcorder or compact camera for vlogging on a tight budget, you will find here the list of the best vlogging cameras under $300 on the market.

This price range is where you will start finding really useful cameras for video blogging that are enough for most vloggers.

Still, they all lack an external microphone port. But this is something very common even in the best vlogging cameras. Most cameras that are really useful for vlogs are compact, so they usually lack the space for an external port. This feature is only common in more bulky cameras like DSLRs or camcorders.

The best solution is getting an external recorder and connect a microphone to it.

So, since you’re going to need to invest in good audio sooner or later, having a well-priced camera that can still record 1080p video can allow you start recording very high quality videos on a tight budget. That’s why I’ve made this list. I tested and looked for lots of information from customers, and these are the winners between vloggers:

The 5 Best Vlogging Cameras Under $300

The prices of these cameras are updated automatically according to Amazon’s current price, which varies by the minute. Some cameras might go above the $300 mark.

​Camera

Flip Screen

Mic. Jack

Resolution

Price / Our Rating

1080p24

from $273.99

1080p60

from $249.00

2160p30(4k)

from $215.00

1080p30

from $224.72

1080p60

from $199.00

Canon PowerShot N – Best Luggability

The Canon Powershot N is one of those cameras that give you a weird impression when you first look at them. The truth is that this camera doesn’t have anything strange other than getting rid of physical space it doesn’t need, and that’s why it is a really good vlogging camera.

Besides lacking an external mic input, the camera has got everything that is basic to record a high quality video blog; it can record up to 1080p, it has optical stabilization, and its lens covers a lot of focal length, and just enough of what you’re going to need as a vlogger. You can use it at 28mm if you need to record in selfie mode, or at 50mm if you want to give it the most natural look and place it on a tripod.

It fits better in your pocket than any other camera on this list, so you can’t carry it anywhere and record a video on-the-go, which I know it’s something vloggers need in a camera.

Although it might look like it has a flip screen, it’s just a 90 degree tilting screen, so there’s no way to watch yourself while recording. Sadly there aren’t cameras with that feature at this price range.

But all in all, this camera has an incredibly well-balanced bundle of features for a vlogger.

The Good

  • check
    1080p
  • check
    Touchscreen, WiFi and NFC
  • check
    Very small and pocketable

The ​Bad

  • Extremely small size makes it hard to hold for some people
  • Low battery life

Panasonic LUMIX DMC-ZS50 – Best Control (Fully Manual Mode)

The good thing about a camera without mic input is that you will get other features for a good price. In the case of the Panasonic LUMIX DMC-ZS50, you will get a fully manual mode, RAW support and more ISO to work in low light.

But the main difference, besides this one being a lot heavier than the Canon ELPH360 HS, is that you can control your camera a lot more. This is extremely useful, of course, if you know how to play with the manual settings. Although the thing you will need the most as a vlogger is the manual focusing to make sure the camera doesn’t stop focusing you in a random moment, and both cameras do have this feature.

The ZS50 is more of a vlogging camera for photographers. You can play a lot with it and still record 1080p60 video. This means that you can also record slow-motion, and it even includes a timelapse mode.

The most important downside is that it is a quite heavy camera for its size, which can make it difficult to carry around, although not as much as more dSLR-like cameras.

Still, it has average battery life duration, although better than most compact cameras (300 shots) and WiFi. It’s just missing an articulating screen and touchscreen.

The Good

  • check
    Fully manual mode
  • check
    1080p60
  • check
    Timelapse mode
  • check
    Small and lightweight

The ​Bad

  • Small sensor
  • Low battery life

GoPro HERO5 Black – Best Resolution

GoPro cameras are for very specific needs, and a lot of vloggers find in them a lot of usefulness, so it’s a pretty popular camera for YouTube channels.

They seem to be extremely good for their price: most of them can record 4k video and they resist incredibly tough environments, so it almost seems like a steal.

The GoPro HERO5 Black achieves all this. It is an extremely small camera that can record 4k and can resist up to 33ft of water. It is a camera made for hitting rec and start doing your thing without having to think about manual settings and still record incredibly high-quality video. And it can also achieve stunning slow-motion thanks to its 1080p120 mode.

But a lot of vloggers don’t know that these cameras are made for very specific needs, and “for vlogging” is not specific enough.

What I mean is the following:

They are made for recording during the day, and specifically for situations that require a fish-eye lens. You cannot choose to stop using fish-eye with these cameras, and that’s a big deal if you plan to record all your vlogs with it.

That’s why the GoPro HERO5 Black is of really good value if you plan to record action videos, but not more. Fish-eye lenses give everything a bizarre, unnatural look. And since they’re made for recordings under de sunlight, their color balance is extremely cold if you’re indoors or at night.

This is a type of camera that can achieve what others can’t, but it can’t either achieve what others can. Don’t use it as a daily-vlog camera.

The Good

  • check
    4k video
  • check
    120fps slow-motion
  • check
    Rugged and waterproof up 33ft
  • check
    POV camera

The ​Bad

  • No zoom​​​​
  • Can't be used for daily vlogging
  • Bad audio

Nikon COOLPIX B500 – Cheapest Option Within The $200-300 Range

Even though most good vlogging cameras are luggable and easy to carry around, some vloggers like to work from home, and you can give up some luggability for better quality video. This is what the Nikon COOLPIX B500 offers.

This camera can record 1080p video, and has good low-light performance with ISO up to 3,200 and has great battery life.

Still, bear in mind that it doesn’t have a manual focusing mode, so you will need to rely on the autofocus. This is not a problem if you record from home, as the camera won’t need to hunt between different moving subjects if you keep it stationary. If you use this camera on a tripod to record your videos, you will find that this camera gives great quality for the price.

It is basically the best one for indoors recording thanks to its increased ISO capacity and low image noise, but it’s still a camera you would need to use with good lighting.

The Good

  • check
    WiFi, NFC and Bluetooth
  • check
    Really good battery life
  • check
    Cheap

The ​Bad

  • Heavy (1.19lb)
  • No manual focus

Canon VIXIA HF R800 – Most Vlogging-Friendly Choice

This one is the improved version of the cheaper Canon VIXIA HF R800.

Even though camcorders are not the best type of camera for low-light recording, this one does a better job than others at this price range. Its price for the image quality is probably the best on the market.

It is a really light camcorder with flip touchscreen, WiFi and decent battery life.

One of its best features is the fast lens: f1.8 at wide will help you a lot in low light. It will also give that cool blurred background effect everyone loves, as long as you set the minimum zoom.

It’s missing a real manual exposure mode, as it’s in the consumer level of the camcorder market. However, its fast lens and articulated screen makes it stand out from the rest of the cameras here.

Still, that doesn’t make it the best option for recording in low-light. Remember that even though its fast lens helps a lot when compared to other cameras of this category, it’s still a camcorder. It still has a smaller sensor than most of the other cameras here, so it really doesn’t outperforms the others if you need to record indoors or at night time.

 

The Good

  • check
    1080p60 video
  • check
    Flip screen and external mic. port
  • check
    Good battery life
  • check
    Internal memory (32gb)

The ​Bad

  • Same R800 Camera but with internal memory and WiFi

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The 51 Best Vlogging Lenses for All Brands [2019] https://vloggerpro.com/best-vlogging-dslr-lenses-for-every-brand/ https://vloggerpro.com/best-vlogging-dslr-lenses-for-every-brand/#comments Tue, 01 Jan 2019 21:39:20 +0000 http://vloggerpro.com/?p=709 If you want to start vlogging, and you don’t know much about the complicated camera industry, you are probably pretty confused about what lens to get. Do not worry. I know it can be overwhelming at first, but I’ve created this massive post so you can know exactly what lens you need for your vlogging [...]

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Best lenses for vlogging - Canon, Nikon, Panasonic, Sony

If you want to start vlogging, and you don’t know much about the complicated camera industry, you are probably pretty confused about what lens to get.

Do not worry.

I know it can be overwhelming at first, but I’ve created this massive post so you can know exactly what lens you need for your vlogging aspirations.

I’ve already explained what kind of lens is the best for vlogging. But here I go more in-depth and I will guide you through all the process of choosing the right lens.

Better yet, after teaching you how to choose, I will give you what exact models are good options for vloggers.

When you first get a DSLR or mirrorless for vlogging on YouTube, your first lens should be one from this list, no matter what your camera brand is.

So let’s see what you need to know first, shall we?

Tell Me, What Lens Do I Need?

First, you will need to know the sensor size of your chosen camera. It will probably be one of these 3:

  • Full-frame
  • APS-C
  • Micro Four Thirds

Most DSLRs have an APS-C sensor, while full-frame are only found in the most expensive models on the market.

This is because Full-frame is the largest size and the one with the most benefits in terms of image quality.

On the other hand, Micro Four Thirds sensors are the smallest of these three and are often found in some mirrorless camera brands like Panasonic and Olympus. APS-C is still common in Sony mirrorless cameras.

You need to know your camera’s sensor size so you can choose the right focal length for you.

Choose First the Ideal Focal Length

A lens with 50 mm focal length will look more zoomed in when used on a Micro Four Thirds camera than on an APS-C.

A lens with 50 mm focal length will look more zoomed in when used on an APS-C camera than on a Full-frame.

You want to choose first the ideal focal length because it tells you how much zoom your camera is going to have.

I wanted to show you how different focal lengths look like by showing you some example images of 50 mm, 35 mm and 24 mm lenses, which are the three common focal length choices for vlogging.

All the images I’m going to show you in a moment were taken in an APS-C sensor camera, so if your camera uses any other size, refer to the following table to know which focal length you need to achieve the same look:

Focal Length Equivalency Table

Full-frame

APS-C

Micro 4/3

80 mm

50 mm​​​​

38 mm

56 mm

35 mm

27 mm

38 mm

24 mm

18 mm

To choose the right focal length for you, you will need to know how you will be using your camera.

When to use a 50mm lens

If you’re recording from home—and you have a lot of space for your studio—the highest quality will come from a 50mm lens.

To use it effectively, you will need a tripod, since it is a lens with a decent amount of zoom.

And you will also need a lot of space and a remote controller to put the camera far away from you.

On an APS-C camera, 50mm will basically look like this:

If you don’t like all that zoom, a 35mm lens is a nice middle-ground.

It will allow you to show a bit more of your surroundings, which is really nice if you want to show more of the place where you’re at.

And you might not need to put your camera so far away, so you will need less space.

It will look like this:

When to use a wide-angle lens (24mm or less)

If you want to use your camera in selfie mode and walk around with it while recording videos, you will need a wide-angle lens that allows you to stay close to the camera.

I like to choose something that is no higher than 24mm for APS-C.

If you use a selfie stick to carry the camera while recording yourself, it should look like something like this:

You can use even wider lenses but bear in mind that at some point things start looking a bit too distorted, similarly to a fish-eye lens.

It is recommended to use a selfie stick—one of these small tripods will do—to use together with your camera, as it will give more stabilization and help you get the camera away from your face.

Do You Need Optical Image Stabilization (OIS)?

I would never recommend a camera that doesn’t have image stabilization (IS) on this site.

Yes, it is that crucial for vloggers.

If you don’t believe me, watch the following video of a video test with and without OIS on a GoPro HERO5 Black:

Nobody wants to get dizzy after watching you while you move around your camera.

However…

A lot of the DSLRs and mirrorless cameras I recommend on this site don’t come with image stabilization… but that’s just because you can buy a lens with optical image stabilization for them.

But it is not true that you will always need it.

For example…

You do NOT need optical image stabilization when:

  • You plan to set your camera on a tripod and just let it there recording

or

  • You need to walk around with your camera while recording but your camera already has in-body IS (digital IS doesn’t count)

You DO need optical image stabilization when all of this is true:

  1. You need to walk around with your camera while recording (handheld)
  2. Your camera’s body only comes with digital image stabilization

Basically, if you need to hold your camera, you will need Optical Image Stabilization (OIS).

Lenses with OIS are more expensive, so you really need to know if you really need it.

And after that, you can start asking yourself how much are you willing to invest in your lens.

And for that, you will need to…

Know About f-Number and Aperture

You will see that the f-number is one of the important characteristics you will see in these lenses.

It will look like something like this: f/1.4, f/1.8, f/2.0…

This is just a measure used to tell the maximum aperture the lens is capable of.

  • More lens aperture = more light the lens allows to enter the sensor
  • More lens aperture = higher quality
  • More lens aperture = lower f-number

how aperture works in vlogging lenses

Remember:

The lower the f-number, the more light the lens can receive. This translates into better low-light performance.

Also, the lower the f-number, the lower depth of field there is. This translates into producing more of that blurry background effect everyone likes.

The lower the f-number, the better quality your lens will achieve. It will give you better Bokeh effect, more light and sharper images.

Larger focal length lenses have more aperture—i.e. lower f-number—so that’s why you should start by asking if you could use a 50 mm, and if it’s too much zoom for you, choose a wide-angle lens with less aperture, like a 24 mm.

Always aim for the lowest f-number you can afford.

And finally…

Do Not Get an Incompatible Lens

The last thing you need to know is the kind of lens mount your camera has.

Even if the lens is made for your specific brand and sensor size, the last thing you need to know is the mount.

For example, not all APS-C Canon lenses are compatible with all Canon APS-C cameras. You will need to know if your camera uses EF, EF-S or EF-M mount.

If you think this is too complicated, do not worry.

I’m making sure I’m including all the mounts and all the info you need to know to see if a lens is compatible with your camera.

You can simply refer to your camera manual—or product info on any e-commerce site—to know the sensor size and mount your camera has.

Now You Know How to Choose

So, finally, you’ve learned to take these things into consideration:

  • check
    Know your camera's sensor size
  • check
    Know the focal length you need for your vlogging style
  • check
    Know if you need optical image stabilization
  • check
    Know your camera's lens mount so you don't get an incompatible lens
  • check
    Buy the lens with the lowest f-number you can afford to get the most quality

Now you’re ready to go to the table I made for your brand and choose one of the vlogging lenses I’ve selected to be great for vlogging.

Happy shopping!

The 51 Best Lenses for Vlogging

Canon Vlogging Lenses

Zoom Lenses

50mm

These lenses present a lot of zoom. I'd recommend you use a tripod to record with these, as you'll need to get away from the camera to be inside the frame, even on Full-frame cameras.

Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 STM Lens
Canon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM Lens - Fixed
Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM Standard & Medium Telephoto Lens for Canon SLR Cameras - Fixed
Sigma 50mm F1.4 Art DG HSM Lens for Canon
Canon EF 50mm f/1.2 L USM Lens for Canon Digital SLR Cameras - Fixed
Focal length
50mm
40mm
50mm
50mm
50mm
Weight
159g / 5.6 oz
130g / 4.59 oz
290g / 0.64 lb
815g / 1.79 lb
580g / 1.28 lb
OIS
Type
EF STM
EF STM
EF USM
DG HSM
EF USM
Aperture
f/1.8
F/2.8
f/1.4
f/1.4
f/1.2
For sensor
Full-frame, APS-C, Mirrorless (with adapter)
Full-frame, APS-C, Mirrorless (with adapter)
Full-frame, APS-C, Mirrorless (with adapter)
Full-frame, APS-C
Full-frame, APS-C, Mirrorless (with adapter)
Price
from $125.00
$179.00
$349.00
from $801.92
$1,349.00
Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 STM Lens
Focal length
50mm
Weight
159g / 5.6 oz
OIS
Type
EF STM
Aperture
f/1.8
For sensor
Full-frame, APS-C, Mirrorless (with adapter)
Price
from $125.00
Canon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM Lens - Fixed
Focal length
40mm
Weight
130g / 4.59 oz
OIS
Type
EF STM
Aperture
F/2.8
For sensor
Full-frame, APS-C, Mirrorless (with adapter)
Price
$179.00
Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM Standard & Medium Telephoto Lens for Canon SLR Cameras - Fixed
Focal length
50mm
Weight
290g / 0.64 lb
OIS
Type
EF USM
Aperture
f/1.4
For sensor
Full-frame, APS-C, Mirrorless (with adapter)
Price
$349.00
Sigma 50mm F1.4 Art DG HSM Lens for Canon
Focal length
50mm
Weight
815g / 1.79 lb
OIS
Type
DG HSM
Aperture
f/1.4
For sensor
Full-frame, APS-C
Price
from $801.92
Canon EF 50mm f/1.2 L USM Lens for Canon Digital SLR Cameras - Fixed
Focal length
50mm
Weight
580g / 1.28 lb
OIS
Type
EF USM
Aperture
f/1.2
For sensor
Full-frame, APS-C, Mirrorless (with adapter)
Price
$1,349.00
35mm

You can begin to use these lenses to record yourself in selfie mode if you're using a Full-frame. On APS-C cameras, use these for tripod recording instead of a 50mm if you think the zoom is too much.

Canon EF-S 35mm f/2.8 Macro IS STM
Sigma 30mm F1.4 Art DC HSM Lens for Canon
Canon EF 28mm f/1.8 USM Wide Angle Lens for Canon SLR Cameras
Canon EF 35mm f/2 IS USM Wide-Angle Lens
Canon EF 35mm f/1.4L USM Wide Angle Lens for Canon SLR Cameras - White Box (New) (Bulk Packaging)
Focal length
35mm
30mm
28mm
35mm
35mm
Weight
190g /6.7 oz
435g / 15.3 oz
308g / 0.68 lb
335g / 11.82 oz
580g / 1.28 lb
OIS
Type
EF-S STM
DC HSM
EF USM
EF USM
EF USM
Aperture
F/2.8
f/1.4
f/1.8
f/2
f/1.4
For sensor
APS-C, Mirrorless (with adapter)
Full-frame, APS-C
Full-frame, APS-C, Mirrorless (with adapter)
Full-frame, APS-C, Mirrorless (with adapter)
Full-frame, APS-C, Mirrorless (with adapter)
Price
$299.00
from $329.00
$509.00
$549.00
from $1,599.00
Canon EF-S 35mm f/2.8 Macro IS STM
Focal length
35mm
Weight
190g /6.7 oz
OIS
Type
EF-S STM
Aperture
F/2.8
For sensor
APS-C, Mirrorless (with adapter)
Price
$299.00
Sigma 30mm F1.4 Art DC HSM Lens for Canon
Focal length
30mm
Weight
435g / 15.3 oz
OIS
Type
DC HSM
Aperture
f/1.4
For sensor
Full-frame, APS-C
Price
from $329.00
Canon EF 28mm f/1.8 USM Wide Angle Lens for Canon SLR Cameras
Focal length
28mm
Weight
308g / 0.68 lb
OIS
Type
EF USM
Aperture
f/1.8
For sensor
Full-frame, APS-C, Mirrorless (with adapter)
Price
$509.00
Canon EF 35mm f/2 IS USM Wide-Angle Lens
Focal length
35mm
Weight
335g / 11.82 oz
OIS
Type
EF USM
Aperture
f/2
For sensor
Full-frame, APS-C, Mirrorless (with adapter)
Price
$549.00
Canon EF 35mm f/1.4L USM Wide Angle Lens for Canon SLR Cameras - White Box (New) (Bulk Packaging)
Focal length
35mm
Weight
580g / 1.28 lb
OIS
Type
EF USM
Aperture
f/1.4
For sensor
Full-frame, APS-C, Mirrorless (with adapter)
Price
from $1,599.00

Wide-angle for Handheld Vlogging

These lenses are made for recording in selfie mode on both APS-C and Full-frame cameras. These lenses achieve a really wide image when using the latter.

Canon EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM Lens
Canon EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM Lens
Sigma 10-20mm f/3.5 EX DC HSM ELD SLD Aspherical Super Wide Angle Lens for Canon Digital SLR Cameras
Canon EF 20mm f/2.8 USM Wide-Angle Fixed Lens
Canon EF 24mm f/2.8 IS USM Wide Angle Lens - Fixed
Focal length
24mm
10-18mm
10-20mm
20mm
24mm
Weight
125g / 4.41 oz
240g / 0.53 lb
520g / 18.3 oz
404g / 0.89 lb
281g / 0.62 lb
OIS
Type
EF-S STM
EF-S
EX DC HSM
EF USM
EF USM
Aperture
f/2.8
f/4.5-5.6
f/3.5
f/2.8
f/2.8
Sensor size
APS-C / Mirrorless (with adapter)
APS-C / Mirrorless (with adapter)
APS-C
Full-frame, APS-C, Mirrorless (with adapter)
Full-frame, APS-C, Mirrorless (with adapter)
from $149.00
$279.00
$399.00
$539.00
$549.00
Canon EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM Lens
Focal length
24mm
Weight
125g / 4.41 oz
OIS
Type
EF-S STM
Aperture
f/2.8
Sensor size
APS-C / Mirrorless (with adapter)
from $149.00
Canon EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM Lens
Focal length
10-18mm
Weight
240g / 0.53 lb
OIS
Type
EF-S
Aperture
f/4.5-5.6
Sensor size
APS-C / Mirrorless (with adapter)
$279.00
Sigma 10-20mm f/3.5 EX DC HSM ELD SLD Aspherical Super Wide Angle Lens for Canon Digital SLR Cameras
Focal length
10-20mm
Weight
520g / 18.3 oz
OIS
Type
EX DC HSM
Aperture
f/3.5
Sensor size
APS-C
$399.00
Canon EF 20mm f/2.8 USM Wide-Angle Fixed Lens
Focal length
20mm
Weight
404g / 0.89 lb
OIS
Type
EF USM
Aperture
f/2.8
Sensor size
Full-frame, APS-C, Mirrorless (with adapter)
$539.00
Canon EF 24mm f/2.8 IS USM Wide Angle Lens - Fixed
Focal length
24mm
Weight
281g / 0.62 lb
OIS
Type
EF USM
Aperture
f/2.8
Sensor size
Full-frame, APS-C, Mirrorless (with adapter)
$549.00

EF-M Lenses for Canon Mirrorless

These lenses are compatible with Canon's EF-M lineup, which are their mirrorless APS-C cameras.

These lenses are really good for vlogging. They are lightweight and most have image stabilization.

Focal length
22m
28mm
11-22mm
Weight
105g / 3.7 oz
136g / 4.8 oz
221g / 7.8 oz
OIS
Type
EF-M STM
EF-M STM
EF-M STM
Aperture
f/2
f/3.5
f/4-5.6
Sensor size
Mirrorless
Mirrorless
Mirrorless
Price
$229.00
$249.00
$349.00
Focal length
22m
Weight
105g / 3.7 oz
OIS
Type
EF-M STM
Aperture
f/2
Sensor size
Mirrorless
Price
$229.00
Focal length
28mm
Weight
136g / 4.8 oz
OIS
Type
EF-M STM
Aperture
f/3.5
Sensor size
Mirrorless
Price
$249.00
Focal length
11-22mm
Weight
221g / 7.8 oz
OIS
Type
EF-M STM
Aperture
f/4-5.6
Sensor size
Mirrorless
Price
$349.00

Types of Canon Lenses

EF

These Canon lenses were made to use on their full-frame cameras. However, they are also compatible with APS-C.

You can also use them on an EF-M mirrorless with this adapter.

EF-S

The lenses are only compatible with APS-C sensors. If you want to use it on a Canon mirrorless camera that uses the EF-M mount, you will need this adapter.

EF-M

These lenses were made for Canon mirrorless cameras.

Sigma’s DC

Lenses compatible with APS-C cameras.

STM (Smooth Transition for Motion)

These lenses have a motor designed to be silent when focusing. This makes them great when recording because you won’t hear the autofocus in the middle of a video (it helps when using the built-in microphone too).

They are especially silent for video and one of the reasons people say Canon is better for video.

USM (UltraSonic Motors)

These lenses focus faster and are silent. Now, this is only true for those that have a Ring USM motor. Lenses that are only “USM” are not that different from a regular one.

Only the most expensive models come with Ring USM. That’s why you should give priority to STM lenses since those are more silent for video recording.

Sigma’s HSM

This is equivalent to Canon’s USM lenses. They are made for faster and silent focus.

IS (Image Stabilization)

Many DSLR cameras don’t come with image stabilization, which is the main thing you should look for if you need to record while moving. A lot of vloggers like to take their cameras and record while walking around with them. These lenses are perfect for this because the image won’t look shaky as you move and record.

Nikon Vlogging Lenses

Nikon zoom lenses to use on a tripod

Nikon AF FX NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8D Lens for Nikon DSLR Cameras
Nikon 35mm f/1.8G AF-S DX
Nikon AF-S FX NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8G Lens with Auto Focus for Nikon DSLR Cameras
Nikon AF-S FX NIKKOR 50mm f/1.4G Lens with Auto Focus for Nikon DSLR Cameras
Sigma 30mm F1.4 Art DC HSM Lens for Nikon
Focal Length
50mm
35mm
50mm
50mm
30mm
Weight
153g / 5.4 oz
210g / 7.4 oz
187g / 6.6 oz
290g / 0.64 lb
435g / 15.3 oz
OIS
Type
AF FX
AF-S DX
AF-S FX
AF-S FX
DC HSM
Aperture
f/1.8
f/18
f/1.8
f/1.4
f/1.4
Sensor size
Full-frame, APS-C
APS-C
Full-frame, APS-C
Full-frame, APS-C
APS-C
from $131.94
$188.54
$216.95
$376.95
from $329.00
Nikon AF FX NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8D Lens for Nikon DSLR Cameras
Focal Length
50mm
Weight
153g / 5.4 oz
OIS
Type
AF FX
Aperture
f/1.8
Sensor size
Full-frame, APS-C
from $131.94
Nikon 35mm f/1.8G AF-S DX
Focal Length
35mm
Weight
210g / 7.4 oz
OIS
Type
AF-S DX
Aperture
f/18
Sensor size
APS-C
$188.54
Nikon AF-S FX NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8G Lens with Auto Focus for Nikon DSLR Cameras
Focal Length
50mm
Weight
187g / 6.6 oz
OIS
Type
AF-S FX
Aperture
f/1.8
Sensor size
Full-frame, APS-C
$216.95
Nikon AF-S FX NIKKOR 50mm f/1.4G Lens with Auto Focus for Nikon DSLR Cameras
Focal Length
50mm
Weight
290g / 0.64 lb
OIS
Type
AF-S FX
Aperture
f/1.4
Sensor size
Full-frame, APS-C
$376.95
Sigma 30mm F1.4 Art DC HSM Lens for Nikon
Focal Length
30mm
Weight
435g / 15.3 oz
OIS
Type
DC HSM
Aperture
f/1.4
Sensor size
APS-C
from $329.00

Wide-angle Lenses for Handheld Vlogging

I have found that Nikon doesn’t offer any viable wide-angle lens for vlogging. If you only have a Nikon DSLR and want to start doing some handheld vlogging, the only lens I can recommend you is the Sigma 10-20mm f/3.5 EX DC HSM.

Why? It is the only lens that is still a bit affordable—still over 300 bucks—that you can use, but even still, it doesn’t offer any image stabilization.

Nikon cameras weren’t made for handheld video recording, so if you really want a camera to record vlogs wherever you are, get a dedicated compact camera, and use your Nikon DSLR to record videos using a tripod while using one of the lenses above.

Having two separated cameras for each job is the only way if you already own a Nikon.

Types of Nikon Lenses

DX

Nikon’s lenses made for APS-C. You can use it on Full-frame (FX) lenses too, but to avoid troubles with vignetting, it’s better for you to get a DX lens for a DX camera.

FX

These are the lenses made for Full-frame Nikon cameras. However, you can use these lenses on DX bodies without troubles.

AF (Autofocus)

These lenses are the cheapest. They use the camera’s body motor to autofocus. If your camera’s body lacks a motor, they can’t use autofocus. This means that your lenses’ performance will depend on the camera’s motor performance.

AF-S (Auto Focus with Silent Wave Moto)

These lenses have an internal motor for the lens to use instead of using the one that comes with the body. They normally have a better motor to use for faster and quieter autofocus than what the camera offers. This is why you’ll find them for a higher price.

D Type

These lenses are an older model from Nikon. Their main difference is that you can set the aperture manually through the lens instead of having to use the camera’s interface. This is now useless, so it’s just a type of lens that is disappearing.

G Type

These are the newest NIKKOR lenses. They lack the manual aperture setting on the lens. You can still use the camera’s interface for this. They are basically more expensive because they’re newer, but there’s no significant difference.

This D vs G comparison is not something you should worry about when choosing a Nikon lens. AF vs AF-S is what you should take into consideration.

For Sigma lenses nomenclature, go the 50mm Fixed Lenses for Sigma DSLR section below.

Sony Vlogging Lenses

Best Sony Full-frame Lenses

The following lenses are a bit expensive because you can use them on Full-frame Sony cameras like the Sony A7S II. However, you will also be able to use these lenses on Sony APS-C Mirrorless

Zoom lenses to use on a tripod (Full-frame)

Remember that the result of a 80mm lens on a Full-frame look like a 50mm on an APS-C camera. That’s why a 35mm lens on a Full-frame camera is considered wide-angle, but not on an APS-C.

You can always go back to my table to check the focal length equivalency for each sensor size.

Sony - FE 50mm F1.8 Standard Lens (SEL50F18F)
Sony 55mm F1.8 Sonnar T FE ZA Full Frame Prime Lens - Fixed
Zeiss Batis 85mm f/1.8 Lens for Sony E Mount
Sony SEL50F14Z Planar T FE 50mm f/1.4 ZA Lens
Focal length
50mm
55mm
85mm
50mm
Weight
186g / 6.56 oz
281g / 0.62 lb
476g / 1.05 lb
1kg / 2.41 lb
OIS
Type
FE
FE
FE
FE
Aperture
f/1.8
f/1.8
f/1.8
f/1.4
Sensor size
Full-frame, APS-C
Full-frame, APS-C
Full-frame, APS-C
Full-frame, APS-C
from $223.00
from $948.00
$1,075.00
from $1,398.00
Sony - FE 50mm F1.8 Standard Lens (SEL50F18F)
Focal length
50mm
Weight
186g / 6.56 oz
OIS
Type
FE
Aperture
f/1.8
Sensor size
Full-frame, APS-C
from $223.00
Sony 55mm F1.8 Sonnar T FE ZA Full Frame Prime Lens - Fixed
Focal length
55mm
Weight
281g / 0.62 lb
OIS
Type
FE
Aperture
f/1.8
Sensor size
Full-frame, APS-C
from $948.00
Zeiss Batis 85mm f/1.8 Lens for Sony E Mount
Focal length
85mm
Weight
476g / 1.05 lb
OIS
Type
FE
Aperture
f/1.8
Sensor size
Full-frame, APS-C
$1,075.00
Sony SEL50F14Z Planar T FE 50mm f/1.4 ZA Lens
Focal length
50mm
Weight
1kg / 2.41 lb
OIS
Type
FE
Aperture
f/1.4
Sensor size
Full-frame, APS-C
from $1,398.00
Wide-angle for handheld recording (Full-frame)

To record in selfie mode, 35mm is fine as long as you’re using a Full-frame camera. If you’re using APS-C, you will need at least a 24mm lens. I also have a section for these below the following table.

Sony 35mm F2.8 Sonnar T FE ZA Full Frame Prime Fixed Lens
Zeiss Batis 25mm f/2 Lens for Sony E Mount
Sony 16-35mm Vario-Tessar T FE F4 ZA OSS E-Mount Lens
Sony SEL35F14Z Distagon T FE 35mm f/1.4 ZA Standard-Prime Lens for Mirrorless Cameras
Focal length
35mm
25mm
16-35mm
35mm
Weight
120g / 4.23 oz
336g / 0.74 lb
517g / 1.14 lb
630g / 1.39 lb
OIS
Type
FE
-
FE
FE
Aperture
f/2.8
f/2
f/4
f/1.4
Sensor size
Full-frame, APS-C
Full-frame, APS-C
Full-frame, APS-C
Full-frame, APS-C
from $748.00
$1,099.99
from $1,248.00
$1,498.00
Sony 35mm F2.8 Sonnar T FE ZA Full Frame Prime Fixed Lens
Focal length
35mm
Weight
120g / 4.23 oz
OIS
Type
FE
Aperture
f/2.8
Sensor size
Full-frame, APS-C
from $748.00
Zeiss Batis 25mm f/2 Lens for Sony E Mount
Focal length
25mm
Weight
336g / 0.74 lb
OIS
Type
-
Aperture
f/2
Sensor size
Full-frame, APS-C
$1,099.99
Sony 16-35mm Vario-Tessar T FE F4 ZA OSS E-Mount Lens
Focal length
16-35mm
Weight
517g / 1.14 lb
OIS
Type
FE
Aperture
f/4
Sensor size
Full-frame, APS-C
from $1,248.00
Sony SEL35F14Z Distagon T FE 35mm f/1.4 ZA Standard-Prime Lens for Mirrorless Cameras
Focal length
35mm
Weight
630g / 1.39 lb
OIS
Type
FE
Aperture
f/1.4
Sensor size
Full-frame, APS-C
$1,498.00

Best Sony E-Mount Lenses (APS-C)

Zoom lenses to use on a tripod (APS-C)
Meike MK-E-35-1.7 35mm F1.7 Large Aperture Manual Prime Fixed Lens APS-C for Sony E-Mount Digital Mirrorless Cameras A7III A9 NEX 3 3N 5 NEX 5T NEX 5R NEX 6 7 A5000 A5100 A6000 A6100 A6300 A6500
Sigma 30mm F2.8 DN Lens for Sony E-mount Cameras (Black)
Sony - E 50mm F1.8 OSS Portrait Lens (SEL50F18/B)
Rokinon 50mm F1.4 Lens for Sony E Mount
Sony SEL35F18 35mm f/1.8 Prime Fixed Lens
Focal length
35mm
30mm
50mm
50mm
35mm
Weight
176g / 6.2 oz
140g /4.9 oz
204g / 7.2 oz
544g / 1.2 lb
155g / 5.47 oz
OIS
Autofocus
Type
E-Mount
E-Mount USM
E-Mount OSS
E-Mount
E-Mount
Aperture
f/1.7
f/2.8
f/1.8
f/1.4
f/1.8
Sensor size
APS-C
APS-C
APS-C
APS-C
APS-C
$79.99
from $180.00
from $273.00
from $278.99
from $423.00
Meike MK-E-35-1.7 35mm F1.7 Large Aperture Manual Prime Fixed Lens APS-C for Sony E-Mount Digital Mirrorless Cameras A7III A9 NEX 3 3N 5 NEX 5T NEX 5R NEX 6 7 A5000 A5100 A6000 A6100 A6300 A6500
Focal length
35mm
Weight
176g / 6.2 oz
OIS
Autofocus
Type
E-Mount
Aperture
f/1.7
Sensor size
APS-C
$79.99
Sigma 30mm F2.8 DN Lens for Sony E-mount Cameras (Black)
Focal length
30mm
Weight
140g /4.9 oz
OIS
Autofocus
Type
E-Mount USM
Aperture
f/2.8
Sensor size
APS-C
from $180.00
Sony - E 50mm F1.8 OSS Portrait Lens (SEL50F18/B)
Focal length
50mm
Weight
204g / 7.2 oz
OIS
Autofocus
Type
E-Mount OSS
Aperture
f/1.8
Sensor size
APS-C
from $273.00
Rokinon 50mm F1.4 Lens for Sony E Mount
Focal length
50mm
Weight
544g / 1.2 lb
OIS
Autofocus
Type
E-Mount
Aperture
f/1.4
Sensor size
APS-C
from $278.99
Sony SEL35F18 35mm f/1.8 Prime Fixed Lens
Focal length
35mm
Weight
155g / 5.47 oz
OIS
Autofocus
Type
E-Mount
Aperture
f/1.8
Sensor size
APS-C
from $423.00
Wide-angle for handheld recording (APS-C)
Sony SELP1650 16-50mm Power Zoom Lens (Silver, Bulk Packaging)
Sony  SEL-20F28 E-Mount 20mm F2.8 Prime Fixed Lens
Sony SEL35F18 35mm f/1.8 Prime Fixed Lens
Sony - E 10-18mm F4 OSS Wide-angle Zoom Lens (SEL1018)
Sony Carl Zeiss Sonnar T E 24mm F1.8 ZA E-mount Prime Lens
Focal length
16-50mm
20mm
35mm
10-18mm
24mm
Weight
116g / 4.09 oz
69g / 2.43 oz
153g / 5.4 oz
225g / 7.94 oz
224g / 7.8 oz
OIS
Type
E-Mount OSS
E-Mount
E-Mount OSS
E-Mount OSS
E-Mount
Aperture
f/3.5
f/2.8
f/1.8
f/4
f/1.8
Sensor size
APS-C
APS-C
APS-C
APS-C
APS-C
$127.95
from $298.00
from $423.00
from $798.00
$998.00
Sony SELP1650 16-50mm Power Zoom Lens (Silver, Bulk Packaging)
Focal length
16-50mm
Weight
116g / 4.09 oz
OIS
Type
E-Mount OSS
Aperture
f/3.5
Sensor size
APS-C
$127.95
Sony  SEL-20F28 E-Mount 20mm F2.8 Prime Fixed Lens
Focal length
20mm
Weight
69g / 2.43 oz
OIS
Type
E-Mount
Aperture
f/2.8
Sensor size
APS-C
from $298.00
Sony SEL35F18 35mm f/1.8 Prime Fixed Lens
Focal length
35mm
Weight
153g / 5.4 oz
OIS
Type
E-Mount OSS
Aperture
f/1.8
Sensor size
APS-C
from $423.00
Sony - E 10-18mm F4 OSS Wide-angle Zoom Lens (SEL1018)
Focal length
10-18mm
Weight
225g / 7.94 oz
OIS
Type
E-Mount OSS
Aperture
f/4
Sensor size
APS-C
from $798.00
Sony Carl Zeiss Sonnar T E 24mm F1.8 ZA E-mount Prime Lens
Focal length
24mm
Weight
224g / 7.8 oz
OIS
Type
E-Mount
Aperture
f/1.8
Sensor size
APS-C
$998.00

SAM (Smooth Autofocus Motor)

This abbreviation is used for the affordable, but slightly quiet and speedy lenses from Sony. They are the lower-end version of SSM lenses, which are truly fast and silent.

DT (Digital Technology)

These lenses are designed for APS-C sensor cameras, which are the most affordable DSLRs and mirrorless. They can be used on a full-frame, but they will crop the image.

OSS (Optical SteadyShot)

This is Sony’s Optical Image Stabilization (OIS).

USM

These are Sigma silent autofocus lenses lineup.

FE (Full-frame E-mount)

These lenses are compatible with all E-mount cameras, including Full-frame and APS-C sensors.

E Mount/A Mount
E-mount cameras can use A-mount lenses with an adapter.

A-mount cameras can’t use E-mount lenses.

Panasonic and Olympus Vlogging Lenses

The following lenses are made for Micro Four Thirds cameras. You can use them on either Olympus or Panasonic. They both use this smaller sensor size for their camera and have compatible lens mounts.

Remember that you will need to buy low focal length lenses for these cameras because of their crop factor. The resulting image on these sensors looks a lot closer than on APS-C.

That’s why I’ve considered lenses from 27mm be made for tripod recording, while 18mm lenses are used for handheld vlogging.

You can always go back to my focal length equivalency table and sample images to compare how these focal lengths are going to look on your video.

Zoom Lenses for Tripod Recording

PANASONIC LUMIX G LENS, 25MM, F1.7 ASPH., MIRRORLESS MICRO FOUR THIRDS, H-H025K (USA BLACK)
SIGMA ART 30MM F2.8 DN Black Lens For Micro Four Thirds Mount
PANASONIC LUMIX G II Lens, 20MM, F1.7 ASPH, MIRRORLESS Micro Four Thirds, H-H020AK (USA Black)
Olympus M.Zuiko 25mm f1.8 Interchangeable Lens (Black)
Rokinon 35mm F1.4 AS UMC Wide Angle Fixed Lens for Olympus and Panasonic Micro 4/3 (MFT) Mount Digital Cameras (RK35M-MFT)
Focal length
25mm
30mm
20mm
25mm
35mm
Weight
221g / 7.8 oz
140g /4.9oz
86g / 3.04 oz
136g / 4.8 oz
635g / 1.4 lb
OIS
Autofocus
Aperture
f/1.7
f/2.8
f/1.7
f/1.8
f/1.4
Sensor size
MFT
MFT
MFT
MFT
MFT
from $175.25
from $169.00
$267.99
from $249.00
from $269.00